THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Calendar

Aug
12
Thu
Emily Joy Zeller: Permutations
Aug 12 – Sep 25 all-day
Art opening reception: August 12 – You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. Art opening from 6 – 8 pm.

Exhibition will be on display from August 12, 2021 –  September 25, 2021

An artistic experimenter and educator from Ohio, Emily Joy Zeller is interested in new technologies and the near-future. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art and the Studio Arts Technology Specialist at Kenyon College, where she teaches classes in web media, photography, digital imaging, and creative coding. She also oversees digital fabrication within the department, and makes all of the technology behave. Her work has been exhibited at the Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery in Columbus, Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah, Georgia, and as part of The Wrong Biennale in Valencia, Spain. Her artistic pursuits range from photography to microcontrollers, joining digital and analog, and exploring the uncanny valley. Zeller received her MFA in Imaging Arts from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York.

“In Permutations I explore and exploit the ability of a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) to become something of a virtual scientist. The network is trained on archetypal photographs of specific objects to learn how they’re supposed to look, and then I use it to create images with calculated amounts of many different objects. The results meld together to form something that doesn’t exist, but at first glance seems like it could in a near-future environment. Aspects within the image may be familiar, but still inherently alien to what we interpret as a “real” space or object. From a distance the images may evoke deep-sea creatures, plant life, and insects, but up close they become painterly and abstract. Characteristics of the source images may or may not be readily apparent, depending on the number of “genes” in the piece, and the ratio between them. The GAN and I collaborate, determining what of the physical world can be joined, and how those hybrids might appear based on what it’s learned. Through this, I play with the idea of what makes us interpret photographic representations as authentic, mixing the real and the fantastic.” Emily Joy Zeller

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Emily Joy Zeller’s prints utilize a unique artform that appears to exist between the realms of SciFi and SciArt. Zeller creates other-worldly amalgamations of objects using a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN). GAN is essentially a computer network that is trained to learn the photographs that Zeller feeds it, and it melds them together into something that does not exist yet is eerily believable. She curates the objects that go into the GAN, creating an interesting partnership between artist and computer. Zeller also includes animated videos of some of her creations that truly bring the experience to another level. You can watch the forms morph, move, and change before your eyes. The videos are reminiscent of time-lapses of biological processes like cellular mitosis under a microscope or a caterpillar becoming a pupa and emerging as a butterfly. The artwork in “Permutations” is intriguing, bizarre, and disturbs the definition of what is real.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Sep
30
Thu
Joan Lobis Brown: Women of an UNcertain Age: Indomitable Baby Boomers Challenging Cultural Norms
Sep 30 – Nov 13 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 30, 2021 –  November 13, 2021

Joan Lobis Brown is a visual activist whose portrait and landscape photographs have been widely shown in group and solo exhibitions in the United States, Europe, Australia, the Middle East and Africa. She had seven solo exhibitions scheduled for 2019–2020. In the last six years, she has been selected for more than 100 international juried competitions. Her work has been published online and in print magazines such as The Huffington Post, ZekeMic.com, Hyperallergic.com, The International Photo Review, Featureshoot, POZ and others.

 “Women of an UNcertain Age: Indomitable Baby Boomers Challenging Cultural Norms” is a portraiture series— accompanied by text culled from interviews with the subjects— that focuses on American baby boomer women of diverse ethnicities, races, religions, sexual identities, professions and socioeconomic backgrounds. 

American baby boomer women—– women born between 1945 and 1964—were the first generation to expect that they could “have it all”: equality, family, careers, fitness, health and prosperity.  Now, as these women enter their mid-50s, 60s, and 70s, they face a unique set of challenges brought on by the demands of growing older while continuing to enjoy those same meaningful and evolved lives.

Women have been, and still are, the targets of sexism and ageism. Older women are often invisible, remaining largely unseen by members of a youth-oriented society and underrepresented in popular culture and imagery. When they are visible, they are often and euphemistically described as being “of a certain age,” as though an acknowledgement of maturity might be taken as an offense. Even worse, older women are sometimes thought of and depicted as crones or witches. As a child, I believed these depictions to be true; as an adult, and a baby boomer woman, I now know them to be false.

Since 2015, I have photographed and interviewed 39 unknown yet outstanding baby boomer women who have shattered stigma, dismantling stereotypes to become extraordinary women launching new careers, achieving physical goals, overcoming adversity and making society a better place for all of us. Their stories cover a wide variety of accomplishments. They are athletes, scholars, activists, businesswomen, artists, immigrants and sur­vivors. They are role models all. These amazing women are a testament to the character, courage, vitality and spunk of American baby boomer women. –Joan Lobis Brown

For more information on the artist click HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Joan Lobis Brown’s exhibition “Women of an UNcertain age: Indomitable Baby Boomers Challenging Cultural Norms” is a poignant survey of women’s personal stories of challenges, growth, and achievement. We are allowed into their private experiences while tackling very public issues for women. Viewers can visually connect with these individuals through Brown’s photographs as they read their stories.

The women represent a wide array of races, religions, and backgrounds that have significant influence on their experiences. You will read stories about illness, body image, immigration, and homosexuality (to name a few). You will be reminded of the struggle and significance of women achieving positions of power, authority, and expertise in a world that consistently resists it. Brown also includes elements from her series “Women’s Postcard Project: ‘I am Speaking!’” in which she asks women of all ages what they would tell their younger self. Brown’s exhibition is culturally and emotionally significant for all in the community to experience.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

THELMA Member Spotlight
Sep 30 – Nov 13 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 30 – November 13, 2021

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

THELMA is proud to present the 2021 Member Spotlight exhibit, featuring the varied artwork from our own members! This exhibition welcomes art from all experience levels and brings them together into one diverse and unique show. With an opening reception on Thursday, September 30th from 6pm-8pm, members of the public can view the art and meet the artists behind it. The Member Spotlight allows us to show off the many talents of our THELMA members and provide a glimpse into the creativity that exists in Fond du Lac. THELMA’s mission is to enrich the community through the arts, and it is a special occasion when we can do so with artwork from within the community itself!  

 

2021 Call for THELMA Member Artwork

Thelma Sadoff Center for the Arts welcomes artwork submissions for the 2021 Member exhibition. Artists must have an active membership with THELMA at the time of submission and art must remain on display throughout the exhibition period. Works in all media will be considered.

  • Deadline to submit: August 21, 2021
  • Notification of acceptance: by September 1, 2021
  • Exhibition dates: September 30 – November 13, 2021

How to Apply

To apply, please email the following to Shannon Kupfer, Curator and Arts Education Coordinator, at [email protected] with the subject line “Member Submission”:

  1. Artist’s name, phone number, and preferred email
  2. 1-10 high-quality photos of proposed artwork. If sending photos individually, label as follows: lastname_01, with the numbers coordinating with the image list.
  3. An image list with the artist’s name, title, media, size, and date

Note: More than one artwork may be accepted. Artwork with individual components forming a whole (such as a triptych) can be considered one artwork submission.

 

Sales
Thelma Sadoff Center for the Arts will retain a 35% commission on all sales.

Shipping
Artists are responsible for shipping to and from the gallery. Hand-delivery must be arranged with Shannon Kupfer.

Insurance
All artwork is insured by THELMA while on site.

Quality
Oil paintings must be dry at time of drop-off. Paper artworks must be framed. Unframed canvases must be gallery wrapped and have clean edges. All 2D artwork must come equipped with hanging hardware. Artwork that requires outlets or technology from THELMA must be labeled as such at the time of submission.

 

Mar
17
Thu
Craig Clifford: Normally There
Mar 17 – Apr 30 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 17, 2022 –  April 30, 2022.

“As an artist I am interested in where high and low culture intersects and how images carry meaning within a society that consumes a huge amount of visual information. My creative practice is an exercise in the transformation of common objects and an investigation into how context, expectation and gaze affect our experience with the things we live with. I use the technique of casting to transform found objects and forms into rich tableaus that use color and texture to alter the perception of space and draw the viewer into a complex experience.

My pieces are made by the assemblage of hundreds of press molded, kitsch forms to create texture that at first glance seems to be a mere surface but then draws the viewer in with slices of recognizable imagery. I could use anything to create texture, but choose to use the trite, sentimentalized images that come from commercial plaster molds. In fine art, ceramics is often considered low art and within ceramics commercial molds are the lowest form of clay as they require no skill or creativity and represent images and clichés as crass novelty items. I transform these hollow, commercial reproductions of ‘art’ to create my work. The forms themselves are cast from found objects like refined teacups and serving pieces from cast off china sets. For myself, these objects are images of refinement and wealth and act as a contrast to the surface imagery.

The pieces show themselves in layers of information that take time to reveal themselves to the viewer. I utilize color as another layer for the work, both hiding and accenting the texture and form. I work in assemblage and use material culture to create works that recontextualize the familiar until it is transformed and unrecognizable.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Mark Mcleod: Worn but Warm
Mar 17 – Apr 30 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 17, 2022 –  April 30, 2022.

Mark Mcleod is an Associate Professor of Art at Middle Tennessee State University currently living and working near Nashville. He’s been in numerous exhibitions and has organized on campus artist residencies for the past 6 years. Most of his work deals with issues of memory, with some forays into systems of power and identity.

His primary focus for the past 10 years has been the ever-changing and erroneous nature of memory.

“Memory is a fallible, persistently shifting, exploitable thing. My interest in memory stems from our inability to store and retrieve some long- and short-term events. I remember few events from my childhood and very little from my recent past. This deficiency has forced me to rely on secondary storage and retrieval methods. Video has become a backup for incomplete memories, and photography has become my proof of moments. My life has been subsequently organized into little blue digital folders by year, month, and event. This shortcoming makes me question my limited recollection of the past and what I have come to understand as reality.” – Mark Mcleod

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

May
5
Thu
Kenny Nyguen
May 5 – Jun 18 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from May 5, 2022 –  June 18, 2022

“My work explores the concept of cultural identity, integration, and displacement. My studio practice is influenced by Vietnamese cultural heritage and background in fashion design. I use silk, a cultural-rich material, as a metaphor for my personal identity. Silk has an important role in Vietnamese culture as well as the traditional art. After I’ve moved to the U.S, my research has shifted from traditional silk painting techniques to deconstruction and reconstruction of the textile itself. I used the material as a medium to paint and build a new structure for each installation. It’s a repeated process of destroying and recreating. Cutting, tearing, beating, sanding. Sewing, weaving, attaching, layering. Silk has becomes the connector that tied both cultures together.

My Silk Piece installations were constructed in the way garment would be made. I sculpted them based on an imagination body. Each fold and drape was secured temporarily with a push pin and constantly changed during the installation process. The forms are not permanent. When I reinstall the piece in a new space this process will be repeated but the result will never turn out the same. The transformation of silk from a delicate to sculptural material was reminiscent of my identity transformation. I see silk as my second skin, borrow it to reconstruct my own self and recapturing memories.” 

For more information about the artist click HERE!

Galleries are free to view:

Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

Reni Gower: GEOmatrix: a Perfect Proof
May 5 – Jun 18 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from May 5, 2022 –  June 18, 2022

Reni Gower has over 40 years of professional experience in the fine arts. Her work has been showcased internationally in Qatar, UAE, Australia, Italy, Peru, Korea, Israel, Belgium, England, Moldova, and Moscow. Additional national venues include the Mesa Contemporary Art Museum, AZ; Zukerman Museum of Art, Kennesaw, GA; Muskegon Museum of Art, MI; Rawls, Museum, Courtland, VA; Taubman, Museum, Roanoke, VA; Kimball Art Center, Park City, UT; McLean Project for the Arts, McLean, VA; Erie Museum of Art, Erie, PA; Villa Terrace Decorative Art Museum, Milwaukee, WI; South Carolina State Museum, Columbia, SC; Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art, Winston-Salem, NC; Virginia Museum of Art, Richmond, VA; Munson-Williams-Proctor Institute, Utica, NY; Everson Museum, Syracuse, NY; Tweed Museum of Art, Duluth, MN; The McKinney Avenue Contemporary, Dallas, TX; Tinney Contemporary, Nashville, TN; and Chroma Projects, Charlottesville, VA.

“My work is inspired by sacred geometry, which is thought to convey sacred and universal truths by reflecting the fractal interconnections of the natural world.  By reiterating these patterns and ratios, my work unlocks the language of abstraction through the collective recognition of geometric perfection that is evident in ethnic patterns all around the world.  This commonality creates connections.   As such, my work is a perfect conduit for cross-cultural conversations that embrace our shared humanity through mindfulness and mutual respect.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays