THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Event Calendar

Mar
18
Thu
Allison Roberts: Trace
Mar 18 – May 1 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 18, 2021 – May 1, 2021

Born and raised in Oklahoma, Roberts’ lens-based work approaches temporality, place, and identity during transitional periods. Exploring the performative relationship between image and surface, Roberts addresses change, uncertainty, and resiliency. Her artwork takes the form of still photography as well as moving image, both in video work and as part of immersive, site-specific installations. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and is the recipient of several awards and grants including a University of Wisconsin Arts Institute Award for her MFA work in 2017, a Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant in 2014, and a Fiber Artist Project Grant through the Textile Center of Minnesota in 2014. Roberts received an MFA in Photography and Printmaking from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2017, an MA in Visual Art from Minnesota State University-Mankato in 2013, and a BA in Fine Arts and Journalism from Indiana University-Bloomington in 1988.

 

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: I’ll Be There
Mar 18 – May 1 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 18, 2021 – May 1, 2021

Born and raised in Japan, Nishiki primarily works on 2D surface while continuing her experimentations with other visual languages, such as 3D expression and video. With her multicultural background and her experience in immigration, she continues to seek the connections among cultures both from the past and present, and she focuses on tracing traditional Japanese activities back to their origins through her research. She exhibits nationally and internationally, and gives an artist talk at various places including universities and art centers. She graduated from Portland State University with BA in Fine Art in 2005 and earned her MFA from Indiana University in Painting in 2010. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Art at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, USA.

I’ll Be There invites viewers to explore their own spiritual worlds. This series, KuroKuroShiro (meaning black-black-white in Japanese), attempts to offer spaces where viewers can privately immerse themselves in their own psychological and spiritual world. Painted with Sumi, an ink traditionally used in East Asia, and made of soot and animal glue, offers a wide range of tones and depths in black. With the subtle shifts of blacks, the spiritual and imaginative worlds emerge.

 

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO4xWF34GgE&feature=youtu.be[/embed]

May
6
Thu
Carol Rode-Curley: Baggage
May 6 – Jun 19 all-day

Carol Rode-Curley’s exhibition Baggage will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021.

Carol Rode-Curley is a Milwaukee-based artist. Without forethought she’s inspired late at night by music, sips of beer and a lot of heart. She creates with pastel, occasional splatters of paint, and subtle applications of random items. Carol’s personality and artwork intermingle as twin masks of humor and darkness. With speed of execution, she looks to find the mystery of corvid presence and fleeting shows of human emotion.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jaymee Harvey Willms: Souvenirs
May 6 – Jun 19 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021

Jaymee Harvey Willms is an artist living and working in Milwaukee. She was born and raised in Maplewood, Minnesota. From there she moved to South Dakota where she received her BFA in painting and art history from the University of South Dakota. In 2015 she went on to graduate from SUNY Albany with her MFA in sculpture. She has had international residencies, shows her work across the United States, and continues to make work in her studio in Milwaukee’s Walker’s Point.

“As a project based artist I use a variety of materials, modalities and conceptual stimuli to create work that is both two and three-dimensional. Ideas are investigated through material and display. The work combines moments of narrative into sculptures and paintings that represent a devastation of self-dom within love, fear, feminism, politics, freedom, poverty, fantasy and survival.

Color, texture and material are used in both painting and sculpture to create the conceptual underpinning of the work. These concepts are
knitted together visually through patterning and highly chromatic colors from children’s stories and objects that hold memory from the collective consciousness. Slapstick assemblage charges the work, allowing the viewer to connect with the absurdity of each piece. To this

end, quotidian objects are painted, used, and collaged in the work in a way that questions their original purpose. This questioning digs into my own personal ambivalence towards power (death/patriarchy) and commodified desire (capitalism/gravity and love of objects). Ultimately the works build new narratives of my own hopes and fears; rescue, lifelong love, new children, dependence, abandonment, poverty, meaningless violence and eternal damnation.”

 

Learn more about the artist on her website HERE.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jun
18
Fri
Artist Q&A Exchange: Jaymee Harvey Willms
Jun 18 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

An artist exchange talk will begin at 6 pm on Friday, June 18 with a Q&A about her exhibition: Souvenirs. You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. You may attend in-person or via Zoom.

Click HERE to connect with us on Zoom.
You’ll need to enter the following on Zoom:

Meeting ID: 894 2011 7394
Passcode: 663543

 

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021

Jaymee Harvey Willms is an artist living and working in Milwaukee. She was born and raised in Maplewood, Minnesota. From there she moved to South Dakota where she received her BFA in painting and art history from the University of South Dakota. In 2015 she went on to graduate from SUNY Albany with her MFA in sculpture. She has had international residencies, shows her work across the United States, and continues to make work in her studio in Milwaukee’s Walker’s Point.

“As a project based artist I use a variety of materials, modalities and conceptual stimuli to create work that is both two and three-dimensional. Ideas are investigated through material and display. The work combines moments of narrative into sculptures and paintings that represent a devastation of self-dom within love, fear, feminism, politics, freedom, poverty, fantasy and survival.

Color, texture and material are used in both painting and sculpture to create the conceptual underpinning of the work. These concepts are
knitted together visually through patterning and highly chromatic colors from children’s stories and objects that hold memory from the collective consciousness. Slapstick assemblage charges the work, allowing the viewer to connect with the absurdity of each piece. To this

end, quotidian objects are painted, used, and collaged in the work in a way that questions their original purpose. This questioning digs into my own personal ambivalence towards power (death/patriarchy) and commodified desire (capitalism/gravity and love of objects). Ultimately the works build new narratives of my own hopes and fears; rescue, lifelong love, new children, dependence, abandonment, poverty, meaningless violence and eternal damnation.”

 

Learn more about the artist on her website HERE.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Artist Exchange: Carol Rode-Curley
Jun 18 @ 7:30 pm – 8:00 pm

An artist exchange talk will begin at 7:30 pm on Friday, June 18 with a Q&A about her exhibition: Baggage. You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. You may attend in-person or via Zoom.

Click HERE to connect with us on Zoom.
You’ll need to enter the following on Zoom:

Meeting ID: 892 9392 1838
Passcode: 077657

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021.

Carol Rode-Curley is a Milwaukee-based artist. Without forethought she’s inspired late at night by music, sips of beer and a lot of heart. She creates with pastel, occasional splatters of paint, and subtle applications of random items. Carol’s personality and artwork intermingle as twin masks of humor and darkness. With speed of execution, she looks to find the mystery of corvid presence and fleeting shows of human emotion.

Her passion for drawing came from her father, a talented cartoonist, sign painter, artist, and comedian. It never occurred to Carol to do anything else. Her work comes from the inside-her dark side, her obvious, and her heart. She loves working with pastels, as there are no tools or brushes between her and the image. It is intimate-her fingers touch the work directly. The color palette is dramatic and passionate, and the textures and flourishes take on a life of their own.

Unsure of whether she is present or not when she works, Carol is always happy to greet each new image that comes to life on her easel. She sees herself as simply the portal to this world from the universe where these images live-the rest is left to the viewer.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jun
24
Thu
Cassie Marie Edwards: Objects of Affection
Jun 24 – Aug 7 all-day

Exhibition Objects of Affection will be on display from June 24, 2021 –  August 7, 2021

“One of my earliest memories was in my great-Grandmother’s house. She had an entire wall filled with shelves of figurines. I was fascinated by these tiny porcelain objects that were strange and exaggerated versions of the animals they represented. My family moved often throughout my childhood and my possessions became a much needed source of stability in my constantly shifting world. I began collecting small porcelain horses and unicorns from garage sales and secondhand shops that I frequented in Milwaukee with my grandmother. I have always been interested in the past lives of the objects in these places – and enjoyed scouring the remnants of peoples’ possessions for these mass-produced treasures.

In recent years, my desire to collect figurines was rekindled, which led me to begin using them as subjects for this series of paintings. I was interested in playing with the boundaries between the genres of still life and portraiture, and high and low art. I am also interested in exploring the limits of representation. Making this work is like a visual telephone game – they are paintings of painted porcelain objects. Many of the figurines
are so distorted and exaggerated that sometimes it becomes hard to determine the animals they originally reference. I am intrigued by our ability to discern what these abstracted forms represent.

Within my paintings, I focus on subtly shifting color, composition, scale, and light within the still lives I paint directly from until I am content with how they impact the personality of the figurines. The figurines I am most drawn to are strange, comical, and sometimes slightly discomforting. In some of these works I intend to heighten the personalities of the figurines, and at other times I’m looking to completely alter the inherent qualities of these inanimate objects.”Cassie Marie Edwards

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Cassie Marie Edwards’ oil paintings evoke a range of emotions, from humor to uncomfortable awe, all the while filling you with misplaced nostalgia. Edwards’ inspiration, her grandmother’s collection of porcelain figurines, has been harnessed and reimagined as she thrifts her own collection of bizarre and charming figurines. Teetering between the conventions of “high” and “low” art, Edwards elevates the status of the figurines as she paints their likeness and brings them into the gallery space. She amplifies their unique personalities as she paints, further altering the interaction between object and viewer. Edwards achieves a beautiful realism that conveys depth and light reflection flawlessly. Coupled with stark, colored backgrounds, she maintains a feeling of the uncanny.

“Objects of Affection” will leave you smiling, intrigued, and walking down a familiarly unfamiliar memory lane.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

 

Heidi Jensen: Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It
Jun 24 – Aug 7 all-day
Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It by Heidi Jensen

Exhibition will be on display from June 24 –  August 7, 2021

Heidi Jensen has a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has won numerous awards for her unique artistic style.

A thread running throughout my work is confusion of the animate and inanimate, an approach to form leading back to the Surrealists. We seek to establish order by creating taxonomies and groupings, fixing things in place. Yet, forces such as desire can destabilize and upend systems and classifications, resulting in new configurations. Circulating in this work are meditations on states of transformation and the gendered nature of material culture. The drawings begin with a compelling object, like André Breton’s slipper spoon, chosen from an array of objects at a Paris flea market.

Buddhist teachings on desire and anger inform these drawings; there is tension between these ideas and the beauty of the object, whether it is a 17th century linen millstone ruff from the collection of the Rijksmuseum or an inexpensive plastic and microfiber duster found at a local grocery store. These anthropomorphic forms hover between the male and female, they contain tongue-in-cheek references to physical anatomy. The brushes and dusters fight off constricting, beautifying ruffles and mingle with the dust and grime of this world.

Narrative is at play throughout this work, in the transformation of objects or in their actions. They burst into flames, scatter bones, extrude other forms, molt. The title of the exhibition is taken from Don Marquis’ the robin and the worm, in which a worm is eaten by a robin and changes form, mingling with the being that consumed it. Objects may appear inert to our swiftly roving eyes, but they act on and provoke us. They are in slow states of change, acquiring patinas and eroding, casting off parts and gathering dust, becoming lost and found.

For more information about the artist visit her website HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Heidi Jensen’s work exists in a space between cheeky humor, observation of life, and flipping expectations upside down. Her gouache paintings engage viewers with rich colors and lively forms. When I say lively, I mean household dusters dancing on the page lively! Jensen anthropomorphizes banal domestic objects as well as extravagant ones. She juxtaposes them on the page, confusing their roles and meanings as we expect them. Interested in the unpredictable flux of life and culture, Jensen plays with the boundaries of animate/inanimate, humble/decorative, and traditional gender roles.

“Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It” is a thoughtful and creative reimaging of objects, processes, and how we fit into it all.

 

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jun
25
Fri
Artist Exchange: Heidi Jensen
Jun 25 @ 7:30 pm – 8:00 pm

An artist exchange talk will begin at 7:30 pm on Friday, June 25 with a Q&A about her exhibition: Everything Is For You Until You Are For It.  You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. You may attend in-person or via Zoom.

Click HERE to connect with us on Zoom.
You’ll need to enter the following on Zoom:

Meeting ID: 857 8649 4343

Passcode: 016964

Exhibition will be on display from June 24 – August 7, 2021.

Heidi Jensen has a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has won numerous awards for her unique artistic style.

“A thread running throughout my work is confusion of the animate and inanimate, an approach to form leading back to the Surrealists. We seek to establish order by creating taxonomies and groupings, fixing things in place. Yet, forces such as desire can destabilize and upend systems and classifications, resulting in new configurations. Circulating in this work are meditations on states of transformation and the gendered nature of material culture. The drawings begin with a compelling object, like André Breton’s slipper spoon, chosen from an array of objects at a Paris flea market.

Buddhist teachings on desire and anger inform these drawings; there is tension between these ideas and the beauty of the object, whether it is a 17th century linen millstone ruff from the collection of the Rijksmuseum or an inexpensive plastic and microfiber duster found at a local grocery store. These anthropomorphic forms hover between the male and female, they contain tongue-in-cheek references to physical anatomy. The brushes and dusters fight off constricting, beautifying ruffles and mingle with the dust and grime of this world.

Narrative is at play throughout this work, in the transformation of objects or in their actions. They burst into flames, scatter bones, extrude other forms, molt. The title of the exhibition is taken from Don Marquis’ the robin and the worm, in which a worm is eaten by a robin and changes form, mingling with the being that consumed it. Objects may appear inert to our swiftly roving eyes, but they act on and provoke us. They are in slow states of change, acquiring patinas and eroding, casting off parts and gathering dust, becoming lost and found.” -Heidi Jensen

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Aug
12
Thu
Emily Joy Zeller: Permutations
Aug 12 – Sep 25 all-day
Art opening reception: August 12 – You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. Art opening from 6 – 8 pm.

Exhibition will be on display from August 12, 2021 –  September 25, 2021

An artistic experimenter and educator from Ohio, Emily Joy Zeller is interested in new technologies and the near-future. She is a Visiting Assistant Professor of Studio Art and the Studio Arts Technology Specialist at Kenyon College, where she teaches classes in web media, photography, digital imaging, and creative coding. She also oversees digital fabrication within the department, and makes all of the technology behave. Her work has been exhibited at the Ohio Arts Council’s Riffe Gallery in Columbus, Jepson Center for the Arts in Savannah, Georgia, and as part of The Wrong Biennale in Valencia, Spain. Her artistic pursuits range from photography to microcontrollers, joining digital and analog, and exploring the uncanny valley. Zeller received her MFA in Imaging Arts from Rochester Institute of Technology in Rochester, New York.

“In Permutations I explore and exploit the ability of a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN) to become something of a virtual scientist. The network is trained on archetypal photographs of specific objects to learn how they’re supposed to look, and then I use it to create images with calculated amounts of many different objects. The results meld together to form something that doesn’t exist, but at first glance seems like it could in a near-future environment. Aspects within the image may be familiar, but still inherently alien to what we interpret as a “real” space or object. From a distance the images may evoke deep-sea creatures, plant life, and insects, but up close they become painterly and abstract. Characteristics of the source images may or may not be readily apparent, depending on the number of “genes” in the piece, and the ratio between them. The GAN and I collaborate, determining what of the physical world can be joined, and how those hybrids might appear based on what it’s learned. Through this, I play with the idea of what makes us interpret photographic representations as authentic, mixing the real and the fantastic.” Emily Joy Zeller

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Emily Joy Zeller’s prints utilize a unique artform that appears to exist between the realms of SciFi and SciArt. Zeller creates other-worldly amalgamations of objects using a Generative Adversarial Network (GAN). GAN is essentially a computer network that is trained to learn the photographs that Zeller feeds it, and it melds them together into something that does not exist yet is eerily believable. She curates the objects that go into the GAN, creating an interesting partnership between artist and computer. Zeller also includes animated videos of some of her creations that truly bring the experience to another level. You can watch the forms morph, move, and change before your eyes. The videos are reminiscent of time-lapses of biological processes like cellular mitosis under a microscope or a caterpillar becoming a pupa and emerging as a butterfly. The artwork in “Permutations” is intriguing, bizarre, and disturbs the definition of what is real.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.