THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Calendar

Mar
7
Thu
Emmet Sandberg: Departures
Mar 7 @ 10:00 am – Apr 20 @ 5:00 pm

Departures by Emmet Sandberg

Exhibition Dates: March 7 – April 20
Artists’ Reception: Thursday, March 7, 6 – 8 pm

Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view his work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Artist’s Exchange: Thursday, March 7, 5:30 pm

Artist’s Exchanges are free and exclusive for THELMA members. Listen to a Q&A talk and learn about his work. Cash bar and snacks available.

These “Departures” examine how I process experience and make sense of the world. The act of redacting reveals how the sorting and organizing of experience allows us to explore the references and associations used to create the narratives that situate us in our time and place. – Emmet Sandberg

 

 

Mel Kolstad: 200 Days: A Life in the Quotidian
Mar 7 @ 10:00 am – Apr 20 @ 10:15 am

200 Days: A Life in the Quotidian

Exhibition Dates: March 7 – April 20

“When Thelma Sadoff Center for the Arts first approached me for this solo exhibit over a year ago, I knew I wanted to “go small” but didn’t quite know which medium to showcase. I also wanted to make a ridiculous quantity of pieces. Enter drypoint! And tininess! And watercolor! I wanted to challenge myself and create very tiny prints – each of the prints measures only 1.5×2”. Every one of them is a drypoint print first, and probably 95% of them are enhanced with watercolor.

Beginning on April 1, 2018 and ending on October 20 of that year, I created a drypoint print a day. That’s 200 days (give or take three days, because I just forgot). Each piece began with a photo I took that day, and I gave myself rules – no going out of your way to get a photo; no “cheating” and taking a week’s worth of photos in one day; and try not to “pose”.

Because I had no idea what was going to happen on any given day, this project was a complete surprise to create. I couldn’t plan for anything! It was so exciting to see how my prints turned out once I had created the drypoint print from the photo, and again after applying the watercolor.

This exhibit is site-specific; I purposely made 200 pieces for the exhibit and the size they are to fit the gallery. The only thing I knew immediately was that I wanted the prints to be framed identically and to be hung in a straight line, like a “timeline” or journal of my days.

I hope you enjoy the exhibit as much as I enjoyed creating it for this beautiful space! Approximately 1500 hours went into the creation of these little friends, and it is most certainly my magnum opus at this point in my career.

But something else happened along this 200-day journey – I fell in love with my work again. I would catch myself tearing up with happiness when creating these small friends, because I realized just how lucky I am to be able to do this. It was the most important thing to come from this exhibit.” – Mel Kolstad

Price list for artwork is available in our lobby at our front desk. Call 920-921-5410 for artwork inquiries or stop in Monday through Friday 10 – 5 pm or Saturday 11 – 3 pm.

Jun
13
Thu
2019 THELMA Members Exhibition
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – Jul 27 @ 5:00 pm

The 2019 THELMA Members Exhibition is a non-juried exhibition that includes submitted work by THELMA’s current members.

Opening Reception: Friday, June 14, 6 pm – 8 pm.

A curator-led tour will begin at 6 pm exploring the current art exhibitions. Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Exhibition will be on view from June 13 – July 27, 2019.

Not a member? Join at thelmaarts.org or call us at 920-921-5410 to participate in our next member exhibition!

 

Liz Miller: Seismic Shifts, Structural Anomalies, and Impossible Dreams
Jun 13 @ 10:00 am – Jul 27 @ 5:00 pm

Seismic Shifts, Structural Anomalies, and Impossible Dreams by Liz Miller

Exhibition will be on display from June 13 – July 27, 2019

Opening Reception: Friday, June 14, 6 – 8 pm

A curator-led tour will begin at 6 pm exploring the current art exhibitions.

Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Artist’s Exchange: Friday, June 14, 5:30 pm

Free admission and exclusive for THELMA members, listen to a Q&A talk and learn about her process, inspiration, and execution of her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Liz Miller received her BFA from the Rhode Island School of Design and her MFA from the University of Minnesota. Miller’s work has been featured in numerous solo and group exhibitions throughout the United States and abroad. Her awards include a McKnight Professional Development Grant from Forecast Public Art, a McKnight Foundation Fellowship for Visual Artists, a Joan Mitchell Foundation Painters & Sculptors Grant, an MCAD/Jerome Foundation Fellowship, and five Artist Initiative Grants from the Minnesota State Arts Board. Miller recently completed residencies at the Joan Mitchell Center in New Orleans, LA and the McColl Center for Art + Innovation in Charlotte, NC. She lives and works in Good Thunder, MN and is Professor of Installation and Drawing at Minnesota State University-Mankato.

My work explores the fallibility of infrastructure and the precariousness of perception, as seen through a materially-intensive, process-based lens. I utilize undulating planar forms in conjunction with fabric and rope as a metaphor for shifting landscapes, altered topographies, and imagined realities. References to the natural world and the built environment collide in interludes that are alternately beautiful, absurd, menacing, and poetic, alluding to the complexity of our world. Tensions between fact/fiction and dimensionality/flatness are endlessly intriguing to me, playing out in my work as a dialogue between reality and illusion.

I have become fascinated with ropes and knotting as byproducts of my process. In my large-scale installations, knotted ropes provide tension that gives volume to otherwise flat materials. This technique has revealed the possibilities of knotting as an autonomous aesthetic expression. The varied use of rope and knotting across cultures and history ranges from utilitarian to decorative, and even deadly. I create interdependent knotted topographies that allude to both structure and malleability. The repeated act of tying by hand integrates an emphatic sense of strength, while the flexibility and nuance of the textile material ensures structural permutations. The resulting works are only quasi-architectural, providing metaphorical insight laced with humor as related to a variety of structural and systemic behavior.

 

 

Sep
26
Thu
David Criner: Living Proof
Sep 26 @ 10:00 am – Nov 9 @ 5:00 pm

Exhibition will be on display from September 26 – November 9, 2019

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 26, 6 – 8 pm

A curator-led tour will begin at 6 pm exploring the current art exhibition.

Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view his work. Cash bar and snacks available.

“If I think about the universe, and what science tells us, life as we conceive of it appears almost infinitely rare. Hardly a day goes by that I don’t meditate on what I see as the utter scarcity of this human condition, or if I am to speak more inclusively, this life condition. I am unable to take for granted, at least for very long, that we are beings complete with consciousness, an ability to sense beyond ourselves, and to communicate our impressions and feelings. If we distinguish ourselves from the inanimate, we as conscious entities form but mere micro-specks within the vast milieu of non-living material and empty space. What are the odds?”

“Painting, while it covers much ground in terms of the various energies that drive the process, ultimately brings me back to this phenomenon, and with cause for celebration. While working, I often see myself operating as both creator and observer, somehow in charge, but never more than a step ahead of the painting itself. The work bears a life of its own, and I feel like only a catalyst at key moments of development. When I am satisfied with a piece and consider it complete, I find myself more witness than owner, as though the spirit of the image continues to pulse just beyond grasp.”

David Criner is an artist working in Chicago. In his recent work, he transforms material in pursuit of an image which celebrates the present moment of life and consciousness. He received a BFA in Painting from the University of Illinois in 1991, an MFA in Painting from the University of Kansas in 1995, and has exhibited his work throughout the United States and Europe. David teaches in the Art Department at Northeastern Illinois University.

Vitus Shell: Now We Here: The Path to Unconditional Self-Acceptance
Sep 26 @ 10:00 am – Nov 9 @ 5:00 pm

Now We Here: The Path to Unconditional Self-Acceptance by Vitus Shell

Exhibition will be on display from September 26 – November 9, 2019

Artist’s Exchange: Wednesday, September 25, 6 pm.

Free admission and open to the public, listen to a Q&A talk and learn about his process, inspiration, and execution of his work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Opening Reception: Thursday, September 26, 6 – 8 pm

A curator-led tour will begin at 6 pm exploring the current art exhibition.

Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view his work. Cash bar and snacks available.

My large scale paintings are geared toward the black experience, giving agency to people from this community through powerful images deconstructing, sampling, and remixing identity, civil rights, and contemporary black culture. In my work, I strive to bridge the gap between the older and younger generations by exploring and uncovering factors that contributed to the unfortunate relationship breakdown between the two.

Moreover, my layered, mixed media painting examines parallels between present day behaviors and attitudes that date back to African roots. With my current work, I continue experimenting with portraiture, acrylic paint, over-sized photocopies of early 20th century vintage advertisements and the incorporation of a foam-cut printing technique. My artistic goal is to exude the hip hop lifestyle with a southern vernacular. Through the use of the vintage advertisements allows me to create narrative based environments, which comment on stereotyping, bigotry, and oppression. The foamcut printing method provides me with the added layers to include text and icons, such as the minstrel images. Having spent much time researching graffiti art, I incorporate a variation of its characteristics, techniques, and unique aesthetics into my work such as paste-ups, stamps, and stencils. Using graffiti techniques allows me to challenge the viewer’s perceptions of what is considered low art or high art, which also addresses classism.