THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Event Calendar

Sep
29
Thu
Lizz Stringfield: Cognitive Environment
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

Cognitive Environment focuses on human and environmental interactions as collaborations. Blending the vernacular of landscape, snapshot, and scientific photography, Lizz Stringfield uses perceptual trickery to subvert expectations. By manipulating the readable information through digital collage, elements of drawing, and unique lighting conditions, the images remain open- familiar yet enigmatic.

Balance in nature is maintained through ever-moving relationships between biotic components (living) and abiotic components (non- living). Psychically, humans are transitioning from a man-dominates-nature perspective to a person(s)-as-part-of nature approach to the world around us. Reframing questions and listening for answers has become the language of our survival.

Lizz Stringfield has shown art in China, Bulgaria, and across the United States; including University of Michigan School of Art and Design and Newspace Center for Photography, Portland, OR. Collages from her Post Nuclear series are part of the Center for Creative Photography: Voices of Photography Collection and she created a Site-Specific Installation for Visitor Engagement in Residence at MoMA PS1. Stringfield earned an MFA in Photography from the University of Arizona, Tucson. Stringfield currently lives in Cincinnati, Ohio with her partner, Francis, and their cat, Lillian.

All digital collages from Cognitive Environment are dye sublimation printed on metal with UV archival ink.

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

Paho Mann: “Paho Mann”
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

Paho Mann investigates the personal and cultural relationships to objects we collect to address shifting values, perceptions, and memory. In the project, Fragmented Cameras, Mann used a consumer-grade 3D scanner to scan historic and obsolete cameras ranging from early stereoscopic cameras to first-generation iPhones. These images explore connections between new and historic imaging technologies. Often, the use of an emergent technology results in some deterioration in quality – in using consumer grade 3D scanning technology the scans often depict objects as fragmented versions of themselves, almost as if they have exploded. This becomes a metaphor for the constant transition of photographic technology and the use of new technology to comment on increasingly obsolete formats of historic image making. The new technology displaces the old, reflecting a tempestuous relationship between the two.

From its inception photography has been thought of as a way to replicate human vision, making copies of the real. This link to the real is intertwined with photography’s relationship to new technology, resulting in various possibilities of how to depict reality. But photography’s fixed vantage point always shows only one possibility of reality or truth. Stereoscopic cameras were an early example of a new technology shifting expectations of how photography replicated human vision, attempting to expand this singular vantage point of a photograph to include the depth and physicality associated with human perception. Among the cameras Mann scanned for this project are several stereoscopic cameras ranging from early 19th century examples to 20th century disposable kodak film 3D cameras. As these historic cameras become more obsolete so do the ways that they claim to represent the world.

In the studio, Mann imports the 3D scans into Photoshop, a traditional 2D image editing software. Here he adds colorful backgrounds using color swatches from photography studio backdrops and by sampling the colors of the original cameras. Mann manipulates lighting inside the software, much like a product or portrait photographer would do in a lighting studio. The 3D scan is cropped to reflect the aspect ratio of the original camera.

Mann sees historic ties between the desires embedded in the stereoscopic cameras to the dual-camera often found in our cell phones to computational photography and the virtual worlds made available through 3D scanning technologies. Through his practice of allowing the 3D scans to glitch, Mann calls attention to the way lens-based media only mediates, but never truly represents reality.

Paho Mann’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Arizona State University Art Museum (Tempe, AZ), Tucson Museum of Art (Tucson, AZ), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN) and the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, PA) among others. Mann’s work is included in the collections of the Tucson Museum of Art, the Museum at Texas Tech University, the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, and the City of Phoenix Public Art Program.

Mann was born in 1978 on his parents’ homestead near Snowflake, Arizona. In 1992 he moved with his family to Albuquerque, New Mexico where in 2001 he received a BFA from the University of New Mexico. He received his MFA from Arizona State University in 2007. Currently, Mann lives and works in Dallas, Texas where he is an Associate Professor of Photography at the University of North Texas.

For more information about the artist click HERE!

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Jan
12
Thu
Robert Knipschild: Retrospective
Jan 12 – Feb 25 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from January 12, 2023- February 25, 2023.

Courtesy of his daughter, Amy Flores, THELMA will be displaying a retrospective of several of Robert Knipschild’s artworks. On display will be oil and gauche paintings, wood block prints, and encaustic works. Knipschild’s art exhibits a mastery of abstraction and impressionistic mark making. His encaustic oils have an array of textures and depth that keep the eye moving through the painting. His subtle transitions of color create an almost meditative composition on the canvas. This retrospective exhibition is a must-see this winter.  

Born in Freeport, Illinois, Robert Knipschild studied art under Zoltan Sepeshy at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. In 1950, at the age of twenty-three, his work was selected for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s widely acclaimed exhibition “American Painting Today.” Knipschild’s work has been exhibited in the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, among others. In 1977, five of his paintings were acquisitioned by the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirschhorn Museum. After a brief illness, Robert Knipschild passed away on November 20, 2004. 

Gallery Hours:
Sunday: CLOSED
Monday–Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm

Shannon Lee: Multisensory Mold
Jan 12 – Feb 25 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from January 12, 2023- February 25, 2023.

At any given time, we are surrounded by microscopic fungi. Our cohabitation with these invisible molds and yeasts is quite normal, regardless of where we live or how clean we keep our spaces. This exhibition exemplifies this reality by making the invisible visible and presenting a variety of fungi sampled from homes around the world. The visual component of the exhibition, fungal cultures within glass terrariums, are accompanied by sonic and tactile interpretations of the cultures as well. By means of a multi-sensory approach, this exhibition not only intends to demonstrate our entanglement with microscopic fungi, but also to counter unwarranted apprehensions and misconceptions. The mixed media tactile pieces and cross-modal Sonifications invite the public to engage with and think about fungi in entirely new and non-threatening ways. This accessible, multi-sensory unveiling of our fungal roommates conveys just one microscopic example of the many interspecies entanglements that humans take part in.

Shannon Lee was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing from UW-Milwaukee and her Master of Fine Arts in Interdisciplinary Art, Media and Design from the Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto. Shannon is a practicing artist, educator, and curator of art. With a history of studying science as well as art, Shannon fuses the two disciplines in her art practice. Shannon is also interested in providing non-visual experiences of art in order to make galleries and museums accessible to the visually impaired.

 

Gallery Hours:
Sunday: CLOSED
Monday–Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm

Jan
19
Thu
Exit, Pursued By A Bear | Impact Theatre Co.
Jan 19 @ 7:30 pm – Jan 22 @ 4:00 pm

Nan has decided to teach her abusive husband Kyle a lesson. With the help of her friend Simon (acting as her emotional—and actual—cheerleader), a stripper named Sweetheart, and the words of William Shakespeare, she tapes Kyle to a chair and forces him to watch as they reenacts scenes from their painful past. In the piece de resistance, they plan to cover the room in meat and honey so Kyle will be mauled by a bear. Through this night of emotional trials and ridiculous theatrics, Nan and Kyle are both freed from their past in this smart, wonderfully dark yet hopeful revenge comedy.

Price/Tickets: $20
Location: Great Hall

Performances:
Thursday, January 19 | 7:30 PM
Friday, January 20 | 7:30 PM
Saturday, January 21 | 7:30 PM
Sunday, January 22 | 2 PM