THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Event Calendar

Nov
18
Thu
Denise Presnell: The Sweet Spot Between Chaos and Control
Nov 18 2021 – Jan 22 2022 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from November 18, 2021 –  January 22, 2022

“I am a painter/mixed media/pastel artist living and working in western Wisconsin. My work is driven by an intuitive desire to explore a personal archeology. Shapes and marks unite to display a map of my creative process. The tools and mediums I use to explore this imagery are also intuitively chosen for their unique effect on the composition. The range of mediums I use is vast and includes oil, pastel, acrylic, cold wax, charcoal, graphite, oil pigment sticks, color pencil and iridescent powders on paper, canvas and panel. My artist tools include traditional brushes, shape makers, palette knives, squeegees and odds and ends of packing materials, cups – you name it. If an object looks like it will create a unique effect or texture while transferring paint onto a surface – I’ll try it.

I speculate that my current work is a form of visual game playing. There is a juxtaposition of random and decisive choices throughout my painting process so that both the conscious and subconscious have an opportunity to interact on the surface of the picture plane. My work involves as much tearing down as it does the building up of visual elements. I won’t allow any section of the surface to be so precious that I wouldn’t risk removing it or covering it over with paint in order to unify the whole. And as in any good game, risk is necessary for the reward. My process involves working on 2 – 3 pieces at a time.

Currently, I shift between working with acrylic on canvas and oil, cold wax and mixed media on paper or panel. With each medium, I concentrate on one piece and begin the additional work or two with the extra paint left on my palette. This results in a miniseries based on the palette, but not necessarily on the composition. Composition is unique to each piece as it is developed intuitively during the process of each piece. I find that shifting from acrylic to the cold wax medium informs the textures and tool methods used between the two mediums. I’ve discovered ways to make the acrylic work like cold wax and vice versa. The layering process is very similar between the two mediums as well. I try to leave at least some areas of all my works with a glimpse of each step of the work process – a sort of visual mapping of my decision making.” – Denise Presnell

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 5 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Emily Mcllroy: The Lilies How They Grow
Nov 18 2021 – Jan 22 2022 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from November 18, 2021 –  January 22, 2022

“I use the practice of drawing and painting as a means of connecting the grace, power, violence, and complexity found in nature, with internal landscapes of thoughts, memories, and emotions. My large-scale works on paper explore forces and elements of the natural world as metaphors for human experiences of love, loss, grief, and transformation. Densely layered and detailed, the nine panels that make up the series “The Lilies How They Grow,” are composed of organic shapes, colors, and textures reminiscent of underwater caverns, glaciers, or the delicate features of animals and plants.

Since the sudden deaths of my twin brother and mother, I have come to see our own inner worlds as “wildernesses” -spaces that harbor great dangers, as well as potential for incredible wonder and discovery. “The Lilies How They Grow” is an attempt to navigate the forces and features of this territory. It is an attempt to understand and accept an existence that is at once breathtakingly beautiful, unendurably painful, infinitely fragile, and prodigiously resilient. Created as prayers for a passageway out of all the has held me back, these pieces look towards hope and faith in the capacity to love, and for the possibility of a life aligned with presence, openness, and joy.!

The title of the series comes from a dream I had a month after the death of my twin. As I was walking along the edge of a cliff at night I slipped, and while falling, saw two small lilies that I grabbed and used to pull myself back up and out of the blackness. Now, whenever traction becomes weak, when I don’t remember who I am, I consider the lilies. I search for the handholds in the dark. I take the seeds of those life-sustaining flowers and try to grow them, not in little pairs, but in full, feracious fields.” – Emily Mcllroy

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 5 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Mar
19
Sat
Art Exchange for Craig Clifford
Mar 19 @ 4:00 pm – 6:00 pm

Grab your friends and a drink and view the new art displayed in our galleries. You’ll have the chance to meet the artist Craig Clifford in-person and learn about the work in his exhibition. Ask him questions about the inspiration behind the exhibition Normally There.

Date: Saturday, March 19
Time:
4 – 6 PM
Price/Tickets: FREE
Location: Susan O. Ahern Contemporary Wing

Exhibition will be on display from March 17, 2022 –  April 30, 2022
Craig Clifford: Normally There
Mark Mcleod: Worn but Warm

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 5 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Apr
29
Fri
Artist Exchange for Mark Mcleod
Apr 29 @ 4:30 pm

You’ll have the chance to meet the artist Mark Mcleod via Zoom and learn about the work in his exhibition. Ask him questions about the inspiration behind the exhibition Worn but Warm.

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/81511113808?pwd=VGN3OEZkSEZ0Vld3d1FnWWdzNzdEUT09
Meeting ID: 815 1111 3808
Passcode: 1234

Date: Friday, April 29
Time:
4:30 PM
Price/Tickets: FREE
Location: Via Zoom

Exhibition will be on display from March 17, 2022 –  April 30, 2022
Craig Clifford: Normally There
Mark Mcleod: Worn but Warm

Galleries are free to view:
Monday – Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Jun
23
Thu
THELMA Plein Air Event
Jun 23 – Aug 6 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from June 23, 2022 –  August 6, 2022

Join us for the first annual THELMA Plein Air Event June 17th-June 23rd, 2022! Artists of all experience levels are welcome to participate in this exciting event. Plein Air painting takes place outdoors without the use of an indoor studio space or reference photos. Artists must remain within the event boundaries.

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

Tom Lundquist: SciFi Jumbo
Jun 23 – Aug 6 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from June 23, 2022 –  August 6, 2022

“Science fiction can be a great source of fun for people who make pictures. Though the subjects need to be reasonably rendered, all requirements for recognizable environments, scaling, or any object’s reason for being may be tossed over your shoulder.

I watched a set of interviews with the actors and FX artists who were bringing Dr Who into the contemporary world in 2005. When they explained that it was a children’s show, I realized that this genre could be exciting (even alarming) without being vicious or horrifying. That was intriguing and a dozen ideas grew out of it.

Why do they need to so big? I had just finished doing a 96 image print series where everything was “poster size.” Changing the scale would prevent me from just repeating those posters with a different set of characters. Since I owned a big printer, I decided to let it roar.

Everything in this exhibit is produced through some form of digital modeling and/or digital painting. I turned to computer imagery after spending much of my youth making elaborately detailed drawings. The ability to create much more complex images was an irresistible enticement and I was willing to put aside traditional drawing values to do it.
I live in Los Angeles, California and teach part time at Santa Monica College.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

Sep
29
Thu
Lizz Stringfield: Cognitive Environment
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

Cognitive Environment focuses on human and environmental interactions as collaborations. Blending the vernacular of landscape, snapshot, and scientific photography, Lizz Stringfield uses perceptual trickery to subvert expectations. By manipulating the readable information through digital collage, elements of drawing, and unique lighting conditions, the images remain open- familiar yet enigmatic.

Balance in nature is maintained through ever-moving relationships between biotic components (living) and abiotic components (non- living). Psychically, humans are transitioning from a man-dominates-nature perspective to a person(s)-as-part-of nature approach to the world around us. Reframing questions and listening for answers has become the language of our survival.

Lizz Stringfield has shown art in China, Bulgaria, and across the United States; including University of Michigan School of Art and Design and Newspace Center for Photography, Portland, OR. Collages from her Post Nuclear series are part of the Center for Creative Photography: Voices of Photography Collection and she created a Site-Specific Installation for Visitor Engagement in Residence at MoMA PS1. Stringfield earned an MFA in Photography from the University of Arizona, Tucson. Stringfield currently lives in Cincinnati, Ohio with her partner, Francis, and their cat, Lillian.

All digital collages from Cognitive Environment are dye sublimation printed on metal with UV archival ink.

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

 

Paho Mann: “Paho Mann”
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

Paho Mann investigates the personal and cultural relationships to objects we collect to address shifting values, perceptions, and memory. In the project, Fragmented Cameras, Mann used a consumer-grade 3D scanner to scan historic and obsolete cameras ranging from early stereoscopic cameras to first-generation iPhones. These images explore connections between new and historic imaging technologies. Often, the use of an emergent technology results in some deterioration in quality – in using consumer grade 3D scanning technology the scans often depict objects as fragmented versions of themselves, almost as if they have exploded. This becomes a metaphor for the constant transition of photographic technology and the use of new technology to comment on increasingly obsolete formats of historic image making. The new technology displaces the old, reflecting a tempestuous relationship between the two.

From its inception photography has been thought of as a way to replicate human vision, making copies of the real. This link to the real is intertwined with photography’s relationship to new technology, resulting in various possibilities of how to depict reality. But photography’s fixed vantage point always shows only one possibility of reality or truth. Stereoscopic cameras were an early example of a new technology shifting expectations of how photography replicated human vision, attempting to expand this singular vantage point of a photograph to include the depth and physicality associated with human perception. Among the cameras Mann scanned for this project are several stereoscopic cameras ranging from early 19th century examples to 20th century disposable kodak film 3D cameras. As these historic cameras become more obsolete so do the ways that they claim to represent the world.

In the studio, Mann imports the 3D scans into Photoshop, a traditional 2D image editing software. Here he adds colorful backgrounds using color swatches from photography studio backdrops and by sampling the colors of the original cameras. Mann manipulates lighting inside the software, much like a product or portrait photographer would do in a lighting studio. The 3D scan is cropped to reflect the aspect ratio of the original camera.

Mann sees historic ties between the desires embedded in the stereoscopic cameras to the dual-camera often found in our cell phones to computational photography and the virtual worlds made available through 3D scanning technologies. Through his practice of allowing the 3D scans to glitch, Mann calls attention to the way lens-based media only mediates, but never truly represents reality.

Paho Mann’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Arizona State University Art Museum (Tempe, AZ), Tucson Museum of Art (Tucson, AZ), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN) and the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, PA) among others. Mann’s work is included in the collections of the Tucson Museum of Art, the Museum at Texas Tech University, the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, and the City of Phoenix Public Art Program.

Mann was born in 1978 on his parents’ homestead near Snowflake, Arizona. In 1992 he moved with his family to Albuquerque, New Mexico where in 2001 he received a BFA from the University of New Mexico. He received his MFA from Arizona State University in 2007. Currently, Mann lives and works in Dallas, Texas where he is an Associate Professor of Photography at the University of North Texas.

For more information about the artist click HERE!

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Jan
12
Thu
Robert Knipschild: Retrospective
Jan 12 – Feb 25 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from January 12, 2023- February 25, 2023.

Courtesy of his daughter, Amy Flores, THELMA will be displaying a retrospective of several of Robert Knipschild’s artworks. On display will be oil and gauche paintings, wood block prints, and encaustic works. Knipschild’s art exhibits a mastery of abstraction and impressionistic mark making. His encaustic oils have an array of textures and depth that keep the eye moving through the painting. His subtle transitions of color create an almost meditative composition on the canvas. This retrospective exhibition is a must-see this winter.  

Born in Freeport, Illinois, Robert Knipschild studied art under Zoltan Sepeshy at the Cranbrook Academy of Art. In 1950, at the age of twenty-three, his work was selected for the Metropolitan Museum of Art’s widely acclaimed exhibition “American Painting Today.” Knipschild’s work has been exhibited in the Baltimore Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Whitney Museum, and the Walker Art Center in Minneapolis, among others. In 1977, five of his paintings were acquisitioned by the Smithsonian Institution’s Hirschhorn Museum. After a brief illness, Robert Knipschild passed away on November 20, 2004. 

Gallery Hours:
Sunday: CLOSED
Monday–Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm

Shannon Lee: Multisensory Mold
Jan 12 – Feb 25 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from January 12, 2023- February 25, 2023.

At any given time, we are surrounded by microscopic fungi. Our cohabitation with these invisible molds and yeasts is quite normal, regardless of where we live or how clean we keep our spaces. This exhibition exemplifies this reality by making the invisible visible and presenting a variety of fungi sampled from homes around the world. The visual component of the exhibition, fungal cultures within glass terrariums, are accompanied by sonic and tactile interpretations of the cultures as well. By means of a multi-sensory approach, this exhibition not only intends to demonstrate our entanglement with microscopic fungi, but also to counter unwarranted apprehensions and misconceptions. The mixed media tactile pieces and cross-modal Sonifications invite the public to engage with and think about fungi in entirely new and non-threatening ways. This accessible, multi-sensory unveiling of our fungal roommates conveys just one microscopic example of the many interspecies entanglements that humans take part in.

Shannon Lee was born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin and received her Bachelor of Fine Arts in Painting and Drawing from UW-Milwaukee and her Master of Fine Arts in Interdisciplinary Art, Media and Design from the Ontario College of Art and Design University in Toronto. Shannon is a practicing artist, educator, and curator of art. With a history of studying science as well as art, Shannon fuses the two disciplines in her art practice. Shannon is also interested in providing non-visual experiences of art in order to make galleries and museums accessible to the visually impaired.

 

Gallery Hours:
Sunday: CLOSED
Monday–Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm