THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Calendar

Jan
31
Thu
Member Spotlight 2019
Jan 31 @ 10:00 am – Apr 29 @ 3:00 pm

The Member Spotlight program will feature a new work of art every quarter, created by members of THELMA, which will be displayed alongside pieces from the permanent collection.

Submissions will be juried by our THELMA curator, with submissions accepted quarterly.

THELMA welcomes and encourages its members to show off their talents for the Member Spotlight regardless of artistic experience. Artists and non-artists are invited to submit work in various forms of media including painting, drawing, sculpture, ceramics, woodwork, glasswork, jewelry and more. Artists must be age 16 and up.

Submissions for the fourth quarter of 2018 will be accepted via email ([email protected]) or mail. Registration form and display protocols can be found in the documents below.

 

Current Member Spotlight:

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Chris Dolan – Beanfield in Autumn

Medium: Oil on canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Laura Schneider – Medieval Paris

Medium: Giclee

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Nancy Donohue – Hard Edge

Medium: Acrylic on canvas

 

 

 

 

 

 

Download the Protocols Form

Download the Registration Form

Jan
28
Thu
Lora Vahlsing Artist Q&A Exchange
Jan 28 @ 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Exhibition will be on display from January 28, 2021 – March 13, 2021

What the Paper Reveals by Lora Vahlsing

An artist exchange talk will begin at 6 pm on Thursday, January 28 with a Q&A about her exhibition: What the Paper Reveals.

Lora is a local artist living in Wisconsin. We will meet with her in-person and for those who wish to participate virtual, you may via Microsoft Teams.

Reserve your spot: In-person or via Microsoft Teams.
A mask or face covering is required in the building.
If you choose to watch the Q&A talk at home, we will email you to connect with us on January 28.

Free admission and open to the public. Cash bar available.

Please RSVP HERE. 

As a visual artist, I create sensorial experiences that  invite contemplation. I use familiar materials and shapes, seeing them in new ways. In my current series What the Paper Reveals, the pieces are both open-ended and precise. My vision focuses on slow art, objects that need precision over a sustained period. My origins are in poetry, drawing, and movement. I invite viewers to re-conceive the world around them, referencing the natural world through intricate forms and light.

I sculpt paper because I enjoy the challenge of transforming a familiar material. Paper holds the recorded light of trees and I’m interested in this history, the origins of a material. I’m driven to discover and explore subjects of place, memory, and time. It’s an insistence of expressing personal narratives in their complexity: beauty and pain, light and shadow, private and public. I sculpt paper in two and three-dimensional forms to heighten spatial perception. My pieces are largely monochromatic because I’m drawn to the subtleties of shape; an often muted or limited color palette heightens visual sensitivity. 

The physicality of sewing by hand is essential, even if the stitches aren’t visible. I’m creating my own webs, intricate stitches barely perceptible from a distance. I’m fascinated with the texture of stitches, and how they hold materials together. The scarring is important, to memorialize places of healing and acknowledge their beauty.

A mask or face covering is required in the building. We appreciate your cooperation and understanding.

Galleries are free to view during normal business hours:

Monday: 10 – 5 pm

Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm

Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm

Thursday: 10 – 7 pm

Friday: 10 – 5 pm

Saturday: 10 – 3 pm

Closed on Sundays

  

 

Mar
18
Thu
Allison Roberts: Trace
Mar 18 – May 1 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 18, 2021 – May 1, 2021

Born and raised in Oklahoma, Roberts’ lens-based work approaches temporality, place, and identity during transitional periods. Exploring the performative relationship between image and surface, Roberts addresses change, uncertainty, and resiliency. Her artwork takes the form of still photography as well as moving image, both in video work and as part of immersive, site-specific installations. She has exhibited nationally and internationally and is the recipient of several awards and grants including a University of Wisconsin Arts Institute Award for her MFA work in 2017, a Minnesota State Arts Board Artist Initiative Grant in 2014, and a Fiber Artist Project Grant through the Textile Center of Minnesota in 2014. Roberts received an MFA in Photography and Printmaking from the University of Wisconsin-Madison in 2017, an MA in Visual Art from Minnesota State University-Mankato in 2013, and a BA in Fine Arts and Journalism from Indiana University-Bloomington in 1988.

 

Nishiki Sugawara-Beda: I’ll Be There
Mar 18 – May 1 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from March 18, 2021 – May 1, 2021

Born and raised in Japan, Nishiki primarily works on 2D surface while continuing her experimentations with other visual languages, such as 3D expression and video. With her multicultural background and her experience in immigration, she continues to seek the connections among cultures both from the past and present, and she focuses on tracing traditional Japanese activities back to their origins through her research. She exhibits nationally and internationally, and gives an artist talk at various places including universities and art centers. She graduated from Portland State University with BA in Fine Art in 2005 and earned her MFA from Indiana University in Painting in 2010. Currently, she is an Assistant Professor of Art at Southern Methodist University in Dallas, Texas, USA.

I’ll Be There invites viewers to explore their own spiritual worlds. This series, KuroKuroShiro (meaning black-black-white in Japanese), attempts to offer spaces where viewers can privately immerse themselves in their own psychological and spiritual world. Painted with Sumi, an ink traditionally used in East Asia, and made of soot and animal glue, offers a wide range of tones and depths in black. With the subtle shifts of blacks, the spiritual and imaginative worlds emerge.

 

[embed]https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uO4xWF34GgE&feature=youtu.be[/embed]

May
6
Thu
Carol Rode-Curley: Baggage
May 6 – Jun 19 all-day

Carol Rode-Curley’s exhibition Baggage will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021.

Carol Rode-Curley is a Milwaukee-based artist. Without forethought she’s inspired late at night by music, sips of beer and a lot of heart. She creates with pastel, occasional splatters of paint, and subtle applications of random items. Carol’s personality and artwork intermingle as twin masks of humor and darkness. With speed of execution, she looks to find the mystery of corvid presence and fleeting shows of human emotion.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jaymee Harvey Willms: Souvenirs
May 6 – Jun 19 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021

Jaymee Harvey Willms is an artist living and working in Milwaukee. She was born and raised in Maplewood, Minnesota. From there she moved to South Dakota where she received her BFA in painting and art history from the University of South Dakota. In 2015 she went on to graduate from SUNY Albany with her MFA in sculpture. She has had international residencies, shows her work across the United States, and continues to make work in her studio in Milwaukee’s Walker’s Point.

“As a project based artist I use a variety of materials, modalities and conceptual stimuli to create work that is both two and three-dimensional. Ideas are investigated through material and display. The work combines moments of narrative into sculptures and paintings that represent a devastation of self-dom within love, fear, feminism, politics, freedom, poverty, fantasy and survival.

Color, texture and material are used in both painting and sculpture to create the conceptual underpinning of the work. These concepts are
knitted together visually through patterning and highly chromatic colors from children’s stories and objects that hold memory from the collective consciousness. Slapstick assemblage charges the work, allowing the viewer to connect with the absurdity of each piece. To this

end, quotidian objects are painted, used, and collaged in the work in a way that questions their original purpose. This questioning digs into my own personal ambivalence towards power (death/patriarchy) and commodified desire (capitalism/gravity and love of objects). Ultimately the works build new narratives of my own hopes and fears; rescue, lifelong love, new children, dependence, abandonment, poverty, meaningless violence and eternal damnation.”

 

Learn more about the artist on her website HERE.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jun
18
Fri
Artist Q&A Exchange: Jaymee Harvey Willms
Jun 18 @ 6:00 pm – 6:30 pm

An artist exchange talk will begin at 6 pm on Friday, June 18 with a Q&A about her exhibition: Souvenirs. You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. You may attend in-person or via Zoom.

Click HERE to connect with us on Zoom.
You’ll need to enter the following on Zoom:

Meeting ID: 894 2011 7394
Passcode: 663543

 

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021

Jaymee Harvey Willms is an artist living and working in Milwaukee. She was born and raised in Maplewood, Minnesota. From there she moved to South Dakota where she received her BFA in painting and art history from the University of South Dakota. In 2015 she went on to graduate from SUNY Albany with her MFA in sculpture. She has had international residencies, shows her work across the United States, and continues to make work in her studio in Milwaukee’s Walker’s Point.

“As a project based artist I use a variety of materials, modalities and conceptual stimuli to create work that is both two and three-dimensional. Ideas are investigated through material and display. The work combines moments of narrative into sculptures and paintings that represent a devastation of self-dom within love, fear, feminism, politics, freedom, poverty, fantasy and survival.

Color, texture and material are used in both painting and sculpture to create the conceptual underpinning of the work. These concepts are
knitted together visually through patterning and highly chromatic colors from children’s stories and objects that hold memory from the collective consciousness. Slapstick assemblage charges the work, allowing the viewer to connect with the absurdity of each piece. To this

end, quotidian objects are painted, used, and collaged in the work in a way that questions their original purpose. This questioning digs into my own personal ambivalence towards power (death/patriarchy) and commodified desire (capitalism/gravity and love of objects). Ultimately the works build new narratives of my own hopes and fears; rescue, lifelong love, new children, dependence, abandonment, poverty, meaningless violence and eternal damnation.”

 

Learn more about the artist on her website HERE.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Artist Exchange: Carol Rode-Curley
Jun 18 @ 7:30 pm – 8:00 pm

An artist exchange talk will begin at 7:30 pm on Friday, June 18 with a Q&A about her exhibition: Baggage. You’ll have the chance to meet the artist and learn about her work and ask questions. You may attend in-person or via Zoom.

Click HERE to connect with us on Zoom.
You’ll need to enter the following on Zoom:

Meeting ID: 892 9392 1838
Passcode: 077657

Exhibition will be on display from May 6 – June 19, 2021.

Carol Rode-Curley is a Milwaukee-based artist. Without forethought she’s inspired late at night by music, sips of beer and a lot of heart. She creates with pastel, occasional splatters of paint, and subtle applications of random items. Carol’s personality and artwork intermingle as twin masks of humor and darkness. With speed of execution, she looks to find the mystery of corvid presence and fleeting shows of human emotion.

Her passion for drawing came from her father, a talented cartoonist, sign painter, artist, and comedian. It never occurred to Carol to do anything else. Her work comes from the inside-her dark side, her obvious, and her heart. She loves working with pastels, as there are no tools or brushes between her and the image. It is intimate-her fingers touch the work directly. The color palette is dramatic and passionate, and the textures and flourishes take on a life of their own.

Unsure of whether she is present or not when she works, Carol is always happy to greet each new image that comes to life on her easel. She sees herself as simply the portal to this world from the universe where these images live-the rest is left to the viewer.

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

Jun
24
Thu
Cassie Marie Edwards: Objects of Affection
Jun 24 – Aug 7 all-day

Exhibition Objects of Affection will be on display from June 24, 2021 –  August 7, 2021

“One of my earliest memories was in my great-Grandmother’s house. She had an entire wall filled with shelves of figurines. I was fascinated by these tiny porcelain objects that were strange and exaggerated versions of the animals they represented. My family moved often throughout my childhood and my possessions became a much needed source of stability in my constantly shifting world. I began collecting small porcelain horses and unicorns from garage sales and secondhand shops that I frequented in Milwaukee with my grandmother. I have always been interested in the past lives of the objects in these places – and enjoyed scouring the remnants of peoples’ possessions for these mass-produced treasures.

In recent years, my desire to collect figurines was rekindled, which led me to begin using them as subjects for this series of paintings. I was interested in playing with the boundaries between the genres of still life and portraiture, and high and low art. I am also interested in exploring the limits of representation. Making this work is like a visual telephone game – they are paintings of painted porcelain objects. Many of the figurines
are so distorted and exaggerated that sometimes it becomes hard to determine the animals they originally reference. I am intrigued by our ability to discern what these abstracted forms represent.

Within my paintings, I focus on subtly shifting color, composition, scale, and light within the still lives I paint directly from until I am content with how they impact the personality of the figurines. The figurines I am most drawn to are strange, comical, and sometimes slightly discomforting. In some of these works I intend to heighten the personalities of the figurines, and at other times I’m looking to completely alter the inherent qualities of these inanimate objects.”Cassie Marie Edwards

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Cassie Marie Edwards’ oil paintings evoke a range of emotions, from humor to uncomfortable awe, all the while filling you with misplaced nostalgia. Edwards’ inspiration, her grandmother’s collection of porcelain figurines, has been harnessed and reimagined as she thrifts her own collection of bizarre and charming figurines. Teetering between the conventions of “high” and “low” art, Edwards elevates the status of the figurines as she paints their likeness and brings them into the gallery space. She amplifies their unique personalities as she paints, further altering the interaction between object and viewer. Edwards achieves a beautiful realism that conveys depth and light reflection flawlessly. Coupled with stark, colored backgrounds, she maintains a feeling of the uncanny.

“Objects of Affection” will leave you smiling, intrigued, and walking down a familiarly unfamiliar memory lane.

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.

 

Heidi Jensen: Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It
Jun 24 – Aug 7 all-day
Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It by Heidi Jensen

Exhibition will be on display from June 24 –  August 7, 2021

Heidi Jensen has a Master of Fine Arts in Studio Arts from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. She has won numerous awards for her unique artistic style.

A thread running throughout my work is confusion of the animate and inanimate, an approach to form leading back to the Surrealists. We seek to establish order by creating taxonomies and groupings, fixing things in place. Yet, forces such as desire can destabilize and upend systems and classifications, resulting in new configurations. Circulating in this work are meditations on states of transformation and the gendered nature of material culture. The drawings begin with a compelling object, like André Breton’s slipper spoon, chosen from an array of objects at a Paris flea market.

Buddhist teachings on desire and anger inform these drawings; there is tension between these ideas and the beauty of the object, whether it is a 17th century linen millstone ruff from the collection of the Rijksmuseum or an inexpensive plastic and microfiber duster found at a local grocery store. These anthropomorphic forms hover between the male and female, they contain tongue-in-cheek references to physical anatomy. The brushes and dusters fight off constricting, beautifying ruffles and mingle with the dust and grime of this world.

Narrative is at play throughout this work, in the transformation of objects or in their actions. They burst into flames, scatter bones, extrude other forms, molt. The title of the exhibition is taken from Don Marquis’ the robin and the worm, in which a worm is eaten by a robin and changes form, mingling with the being that consumed it. Objects may appear inert to our swiftly roving eyes, but they act on and provoke us. They are in slow states of change, acquiring patinas and eroding, casting off parts and gathering dust, becoming lost and found.

For more information about the artist visit her website HERE!

 

Notes from Shannon Kupfer, THELMA’s Curator

Heidi Jensen’s work exists in a space between cheeky humor, observation of life, and flipping expectations upside down. Her gouache paintings engage viewers with rich colors and lively forms. When I say lively, I mean household dusters dancing on the page lively! Jensen anthropomorphizes banal domestic objects as well as extravagant ones. She juxtaposes them on the page, confusing their roles and meanings as we expect them. Interested in the unpredictable flux of life and culture, Jensen plays with the boundaries of animate/inanimate, humble/decorative, and traditional gender roles.

“Everything Is For You Until You Discover You Are For It” is a thoughtful and creative reimaging of objects, processes, and how we fit into it all.

 

 

 

Galleries are free to view:
Monday: 10 – 5 pm
Tuesday: 10 – 5 pm
Wednesday: 10 – 5 pm
Thursday: 10 – 7 pm
Friday: 10 – 5 pm
Open Saturdays 11 – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays.