THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Calendar

Oct
15
Tue
Lake Reading Series with Author Nickolas Butler
Oct 15 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Meet an author! Nickolas Butler will read a selection of his work. There will be open mic before his reading.
 
Born in Allentown, Pennsylvania, Nickolas Butler was raised in Eau Claire and educated at the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the University of Iowa Writer’s Workshop. His first novel was the internationally best-selling and prize-winning Shotgun Lovesongs, which has been optioned for film development and translated into ten languages. Beneath the Bonfire, a collection of short stories, followed a year later. In 2017, The Hearts of Men was short-listed for two of France’s most prestigious literary prizes even before its American publishing. In 2019, his fourth book, Little Faith was published, and he is already at work on another novel set in the mountains of the American West. Prior to publishing Shotgun Lovesongs, Butler worked a long list of jobs including: coffee roaster, liquor store clerk, office manager, hot-dog vendor, author escort, meat-packer, bed-and-breakfast manager, telemarketer, and Burger King maintenance man. He is married and lives with his wife and two children on sixteen acres of land adjacent to a buffalo farm in rural Wisconsin.
 
Cash bar available.
 
Arrangements for the appearance of Nickolas Butler made through HarperCollins Speakers Bureau, NY, NY.
 
Part of THELMA’s Lake Reading Series. A free event focusing on visual arts, music, film and theatre. Cash bar. Bar opens at 6 pm.
 
Jan
9
Thu
Christopher Dowell: 20 Below
Jan 9 @ 10:00 am – Feb 15 @ 5:00 pm

Exhibition will be on display from January 9 – February 15, 2020.

“In the pursuit of sturgeon, we found ourselves standing on the ice in a landscape devoid of any visible horizon. The snow blew past in ribbons, and the wind burned any exposed skin. We moved the shack over the hole cut in the ice, and now, sheltered from the wind, we took our first look into the abyss below my feet.

The exhibition 20 Below explores the tradition and dedication to sturgeon spearing on Lake Winnebago. How vital this mysterious and ancient fish is to the way of life, and how critical this community is to the lake sturgeons’ sustainability. There is still much work ahead for those involved with ensuring the future of the fish in Lake Winnebago. There is a collective will, to ensure that future generations can continue to participate in a tradition, securing the lake sturgeons’ population for future generations. Thanks to the community’s respect and understanding of its history and its passion for protecting and conserving the fish there is hope that we could be witnessing a renaissance, a return to the heyday of lake sturgeon.”

Fish of Legends
Jan 9 @ 10:00 am – Feb 15 @ 5:00 pm

Exhibition will be on display from January 9 – February 15, 2020.

Stories have existed long before recorded history, and the telling of stories has changed forms drastically throughout the ages. Although the methods have changed, the desire to tell and hear stories has remained unchanged, and still greatly impacts the way we look at life. From generation to generation, fishing stories have served as a source of fascination, humor and pride. Many of these stories have been retold and embellished upon to the point they become legendary. The work in this exhibition focuses on such legendary stories of the sturgeon. The stories on display have been gathered and reinterpreted by local artists through painting, drawing, printmaking, graphic media and sculpture. Each of these artists uses the power of the visual image to ignite imaginations, evoke emotions and capture universal cultural truths to form a connection with this celebrated ancient fish.

Apr
16
Thu
Lake Reading Series: Student Voices **VIRTUAL**
Apr 16 @ 7:00 pm – 9:00 pm
Students will be creating videos of readings of their written work. We will share the videos on this page as well as our Facebook page on April 16.
This evening is for the upcoming student poets and writers to shine. Local students will read from pieces of their own work. Listen to original work created by local students!
 
This reading is supported by Marian University.
 
Part of THELMA’s Lake Reading Series. A free event focusing on visual arts, music, film and theatre. 
 
Jun
1
Mon
Virtual THELMA Book Club
Jun 1 @ 7:00 pm – 8:45 pm
Get ready for the next meeting of the THELMA Book Club! We are reading The Yellow Bird Sings by Jennifer Rosner.
 
You don’t have to finish the book, or even have read it, to attend! Join the THELMA Book Club! It’s free and open to the public! Members are responsible to get their own books. You may purchase a book HERE.
 
Led by Amy Manion, join us for our next meeting June 1 at 7 pm. We meet the first Monday of the month. We will take our book club meeting online. To join, email Jacqui at [email protected] so she can email you the invitation. We would use Zoom so all you need is a computer, tablet or phone with your camera and audio settings on. Deadline to register would be 6 pm on June 1, one hour prior to the start. Please stay tuned on how we will meet!

 

“Rosner’s exquisite, heart-rending debut novel is proof that there’s always going to be room for another story about World War II….This is an absolutely beautiful and necessary novel, full of heartbreak but also hope, about the bond between mother and daughter, and the sacrifices made for love.” The New York Times

In Poland, as World War II rages, a mother hides with her young daughter, a musical prodigy whose slightest sound may cost them their lives.

Jul
16
Thu
Melissa Wilkinson: UnNatural Histories
Jul 16 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

UnNatural Histories

Exhibition will be on display from July 16 – August 29, 2020

Opening Reception: July 17, 2020, 6 – 8 pm
 
A curator-led tour will begin at 6:30 pm exploring the current art exhibitions.
 
Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

This series of paintings relates to my interest in dichotomies: obscuring and revealing, attraction and repulsion, good and evil, the past and the present. Through a tediously crafted watercolor painting practice I seek to make something strange out of the ordinary. I am deeply interested in the interaction of parts and am attracted to the tactile in an increasingly technological and dehumanized time. I appropriate imagery from 19th century naturalist illustrators such as John James Audubon, Jacques Barraband and Elizabeth Gould and pair with superficially sensual subject matter to develop a pastiche that fractures both into the surreal and suggestive. I draw from sensual imagery sourced from internet searches, bodies, fabrics, shells, gems, flowers, etc. in order to open a curio chest that examines the 21st century obsession with all things slick and hollow. The images break from their original sources into fragments, creating a complex visual experience that both irritates and seduces. I paint these images to investigate the slippery definition of both desire and corporeality.

The romantic process of painting allows me to meditate on issues of gender, identity construction and beauty. Though the paintings are initially conceived of using digital processes,they are made employing a very purist approach to watercolor. In doing so, I endeavor to uphold these painting processes while dismantling the elitism with which they are often associated.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Jul
17
Fri
Adriane Little: Mapping Mrs. Dalloway
Jul 17 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Mapping Mrs. Dalloway by Adriane Little

Exhibition will be on display from July 16 – August 29, 2020

Opening Reception: July 17, 2020, 6 – 8 pm
 
A curator-led tour will begin at 6:30 pm exploring the current art exhibitions.
 
Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Artist’s Exchange: Stay tuned for time and date!

Free admission. Listen to a Q&A talk and learn about her process, inspiration, and execution of her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Literature is riddled with dead or otherwise missing mothers. Virginia Woolf’s life and writing were partly, yet significantly guided by the death of her mother when Woolf was just 13-years-old. This loss reappears across her novels. As an artist, I am interested in studying both her writing and her as a woman who experienced this early and profound loss. Conceptually, this work is supported by continued research to advance the trope of the missing mother. Mapping Mrs. Dalloway represents a new way of visualizing text and image within my practice by incorporating data mapping in this new work.

For Mapping Mrs. Dalloway, I walked the streets of London and photographed along the path that Mrs. Dalloway walks in the novel. In doing so, I brought the walking path and Mrs. Dalloway forward 90 years into the present. These are the same streets that Woolf herself walked countless times. My intention was not to illustrate the novel, but instead to use stream of consciousness in capturing the images. This mirrors the literary strategy of the novel. This project challenged me to photograph in a new way. I was limited to a specific amount of time while in England. I knew where I would walk but I was not certain what I would actually find. As each day past, I became more familiar with the sense of place created by the movement of people in the city and the project evolved.

After returning from England, I divided the text of the novel into 20 sections. Each section is then visualized as a word count of the novel and layered over an image in the series. The circles grow larger the more often a particular word was repeated. The green that is used for the data mapping was color matched from photographs I took of the wall paint while inside of Monk’s House. The data visualization both obscures and reveals information within each image. I perceive the interaction of the mapping within each image as moments of loss.

Adriane Little is a conceptual artist and educator living in Kalamazoo Michigan. Her studio practice originates from the perspective of photographic processes, but also crosses media and theoretical positions. The underpinnings of her visual work and research are at an intersection of trauma and ritual through an interrogation of a presence and absence of the maternal body. The translation of this space is both literal and metaphor or the architecture of an ephemeral maternal space that is embedded within what she calls the matrilineal ghost. As a continuation of these ideas, recent work turns to literature as a source of visualization. Literature is riddled with dead or otherwise missing mothers.

By both committee and invitation, her artwork has received national and international recognition in numerous exhibitions and video screenings. Since arriving to Western Michigan University in fall 2006, her artwork has exhibited in 57 different venues in 52 international cities and in 87 different venues in 69 U.S. cities. Most notable and recent venues include; Gallery 1401 (Philadelphia PA), CEPA Gallery (Buffalo NY), the Institute of Culture (Trbovlje Slovenia), The Center for Photography at Woodstock (Woodstock NY), Albright-Knox Art Gallery (Buffalo NY), Chelsea Art Museum (NYC), Syracuse International Film Festival, Siouxland Film Festival, Milwaukee Short Film Festival, Dawson City International Film Festival in the Yukon, Macon Film and Video Festival, Three Rivers Film Festival and the Leeds International Film Festival in the UK, among others. She has curated several exhibitions including Plus 3 Ferris Wheels, 17 Days and several solo exhibitions in galleries and online.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Sep
3
Thu
Alexandra Opie: Wonder Box
Sep 3 @ 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm

Wonder Box by Alexandra Opie

Exhibition will be on display from September 3 – October 17, 2020

Opening Reception: September 3, 2020, 6 – 8 pm

A curator-led tour will begin at 6:30 pm exploring the current art exhibition.

Free admission and open to the public, meet the artist as you view her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

Artist’s Exchange: Stay tuned for time and date!

Free admission and exclusive for THELMA members, listen to a Q&A talk and learn about her process, inspiration, and execution of her work. Cash bar and snacks available.

The antique forms of tintype, ambrotype, and prints from glass-plate negatives allow for a heightened awareness of the intense beauty and mystery of the mundane. These plant parts are photographed in extreme macro–with an eight-foot long camera and a scavenged military aerial survey lens–in a way that intentionally confuses perception. The resulting ambiguous scale, in conjunction with a composition reminiscent of portraiture, lends a corporeality to these plant specimens. Lines between plant and human are blurred as these organic forms mimic the familiar: silhouettes, hands, gestures, viscera, genitalia.