THELMA SADOFF CENTER FOR THE ARTS

Event Calendar

Aug
11
Thu
Mayuko Ono Gray: 諸行無常_This Too, Shall Pass
Aug 11 – Sep 24 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from August 11, 2022 – September 24, 2022.

“Reflecting a life which is both culturally Japanese and American, my graphite drawings hybridize influences from traditional Japanese calligraphy combined with Western drawing practices and aesthetics. Ejected out of Japan at the age of 18 with full of curiosity and no fear, swallowed by America, nearly dead, my works emerge from my experiences of displacement, immigration, deportation, love, trauma, the crush of motherhood, failed relationships and other meaningful encounters with the unknowable. My current works investigate and examine the unknowable through both images and proverbs.

Growing up in Japan, every Saturday afternoon was spent with my Sensei, a calligraphy master who would assign words for each of us to practice. We would spend hours producing copies of the Sensei’s sample. The goal was to imitate the sample, paying attention to the line quality, the varying speed, the pressure and angle of the brush movement. The handling of the brush had to become rhythmic and graceful.

At high school age, in preparation to entrance exam to art university in Japan, I had to take private lessons to learn drawing with graphite and charcoal practicing techniques such as chiaroscuro and sfumato. Saturday afternoons were then spent at a Western style art studio with pedestals, still lifes, and white marble copies of Roman busts instead of tatami mat calligraphy studio sitting on the floor. The fluid ink was replaced with malleable graphite and ephemeral charcoal. The wet immediacy of calligraphic line was replaced with illusionistic volumes meticulously rendered. Instead of going through dozens of rice papers in a session, one sheet of high-quality cotton paper was given to work on. But I never applied to college there.

 

Traditional Asian art-forms have often integrated word and image, and my interest and practice also follow the path in my unique way. In my current works, I mostly use images of persons, animals, and still lifes captured in my banal daily experiences. A Japanese proverb accompanies each work, spelling out the hiragana and kanji, characters intertwine to create a single line which has only one entrance and one exit. The calligraphic line begins at the top right and ends toward the bottom left of the page, following traditional Asian writing. The single line going through a pictorial plane is a metaphor of a life: one entrance as birth of physical body, and one exit as death and loss of physical body, and all the complicated experiences during existence between these two.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Aug
27
Sat
Yoga on the Plaza
Aug 27 @ 10:00 am – 11:00 am

We’ll be outside on the Plaza for Yoga on Saturday mornings! This is a one-hour yoga class with Instructor Lora Vahlsing. Lora Vahlsing, certified yoga instructor, will lead you through a very special yoga class. In this gentle practice you’ll be led through poses and a meditation that highlights the artistry of the practice.No experience needed. Bring your own mats and wear comfortable layers.

$20 ($16 for THELMA Members)

Limited class size. Pre-register to ensure spot.

REGISTER HERE

Sep
29
Thu
Lizz Stringfield: Cognitive Environment
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

“Blending the vernacular of snapshot, landscape, and scientific photography, my work uses perceptual trickery to subvert visual expectations. By manipulating the readable information through unique lighting conditions, digital collage, and elements of drawing, an image remains open– familiar yet new.

Environmental Cognition, Cognitive Environment, and Coruscate are segments of a collection of photographs focused on human and environmental interactions as collaborations. Balance in nature is maintained through ever-moving relationships between biotic components (living) and abiotic components (nonliving). Psychically, humans are transitioning from a man-dominates-nature perspective to a person(s)-as-part-of nature approach to the world around us.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Paho Mann: “Paho Mann”
Sep 29 – Nov 12 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from September 29 – November 12, 2022.

Paho Mann investigates the personal and cultural relationships to objects we collect to address shifting values, perceptions, and memory. In the project, Fragmented Cameras, Mann used a consumer-grade 3D scanner to scan historic and obsolete cameras ranging from early stereoscopic cameras to first-generation iPhones. These images explore connections between new and historic imaging technologies. Often, the use of an emergent technology results in some deterioration in quality – in using consumer grade 3D scanning technology the scans often depict objects as fragmented versions of themselves, almost as if they have exploded. This becomes a metaphor for the constant transition of photographic technology and the use of new technology to comment on increasingly obsolete formats of historic image making. The new technology displaces the old, reflecting a tempestuous relationship between the two.

From its inception photography has been thought of as a way to replicate human vision, making copies of the real. This link to the real is intertwined with photography’s relationship to new technology, resulting in various possibilities of how to depict reality. But photography’s fixed vantage point always shows only one possibility of reality or truth. Stereoscopic cameras were an early example of a new technology shifting expectations of how photography replicated human vision, attempting to expand this singular vantage point of a photograph to include the depth and physicality associated with human perception. Among the cameras Mann scanned for this project are several stereoscopic cameras ranging from early 19th century examples to 20th century disposable kodak film 3D cameras. As these historic cameras become more obsolete so do the ways that they claim to represent the world.

In the studio, Mann imports the 3D scans into Photoshop, a traditional 2D image editing software. Here he adds colorful backgrounds using color swatches from photography studio backdrops and by sampling the colors of the original cameras. Mann manipulates lighting inside the software, much like a product or portrait photographer would do in a lighting studio. The 3D scan is cropped to reflect the aspect ratio of the original camera.

Mann sees historic ties between the desires embedded in the stereoscopic cameras to the dual-camera often found in our cell phones to computational photography and the virtual worlds made available through 3D scanning technologies. Through his practice of allowing the 3D scans to glitch, Mann calls attention to the way lens-based media only mediates, but never truly represents reality.

Paho Mann’s work has been included in exhibitions at the Arizona State University Art Museum (Tempe, AZ), Tucson Museum of Art (Tucson, AZ), Walker Art Center (Minneapolis, MN) and the Carnegie Museum of Art (Pittsburgh, PA) among others. Mann’s work is included in the collections of the Tucson Museum of Art, the Museum at Texas Tech University, the Nerman Museum of Contemporary Art, and the City of Phoenix Public Art Program.

Mann was born in 1978 on his parents’ homestead near Snowflake, Arizona. In 1992 he moved with his family to Albuquerque, New Mexico where in 2001 he received a BFA from the University of New Mexico. He received his MFA from Arizona State University in 2007. Currently, Mann lives and works in Dallas, Texas where he is an Associate Professor of Photography at the University of North Texas

For more information about the artist click HERE!

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Nov
17
Thu
Meredith Setser: “Strata Verse”
Nov 17 2022 – Jan 7 2023 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from November 17, 2022 – January 7, 2023.

Meredith Setser is and printmaker and textile artist currently employed as an assistant professor of printmaking at the Herron School of Art and Design in Indianapolis. She studied at both Edinboro University in Pennsylvania and Indiana University (IUPUI campus) for her undergraduate studies, earning a BFA in 1997. She also attended graduate school at the University of Wisconsin-Madison where she completed her MFA degree in 2004. Meredith has taught printmaking courses as an adjunct instructor at both the University of Wisconsin-Madison and the Milwaukee School of Art and Design.

Meredith is an active member of the printmaking community and has attended several conferences, including the Southern Graphics Council Conference in Madison, Wisconsin, where she gave a demonstration entitled “Printing on Unusual Surfaces”. She most recently gave a plaster pronto plate lithography demonstration at the 2008 Mid-America Art conference. Her plaster technique is featured on Friedhard Kiekeben’s site dedicated for nontoxic printmaking, www.nontoxicprint.com.

Some recent shows include the Qijiang International Print Exhibition in South West China, the 12th Annual Washington Printmaker’s Small Print Exhibition in Washington, DC, Folly, a solo exhibition at the Basile Gallery in Indianapolis, and Perform/Install III at the South Bend Museum of Art. Along with teaching printmaking, Meredith has given several workshops and demonstrations in the textile medium of felt making across the United States. She currently resides in Indianapolis with her partner George, 3 iguanas, 4 birds, and 9 tortoises. Although she now lives in the great state of Indiana, Meredith was born in Wyandotte, Michigan and spent much of her childhood here. In spite of her busy work schedule, she still finds the time to vacation annually in Rose City, Michigan, and migrates to Detroit several times a year to catch Red Wings hockey at the Joe Louis Arena.

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays

Michael Litzau: Acts of Devotion
Nov 17 2022 – Jan 7 2023 all-day

Exhibition will be on display from November 17, 2022 – January 7, 2023.

“Ritual is described as an established or prescribed procedure for a religious or other rite. In a sense, a ritual is a physical action that affirms ones connection and belonging to a higher being. If one were to devote more time and effort to something, would they be more connected or valued? My artwork embraces tedious techniques and time consuming art making. I utilize a variety of techniques that are aesthetically different but connected in subject matter. In my work I use cross-stitch, hand cut copper and printmaking because they are meticulous and repetitive. The visuals in my artwork are players of the Green Bay Packers. Through my dedication to time consuming processes I am proving my worth as a fan. By spending obsessive hours on attention to detail I elevate my subject matter from a mere image to an iconic level.

Growing up in Wisconsin I was indoctrinated into being a fan of the Green Bay Packers. As I have moved around the country I find that running into a random Packer fan is a welcome connection to another person but also to home. With fellow fans I can talk about how the season is going, last weeks game, or even where they are from. It is human nature to want to be a part of a group. My artwork, in part, is about connections with others over shared interests and experiences.”

For more information about the artist click HERE!

 

Galleries are free to view:

Monday – Friday: 10 am – 5 pm
Saturday: 10 am – 3 pm
Closed on Sundays